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Moving out of the Country? How to Make Yourself at Home Abroad (Part 2)

This is the second part of our article series to help you settle into your new life after moving out of the country. You can read more in the introductory part (Part 1).

Globe - moving out of the country

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Moving out of the country? Tips for the transition

In our previous post we have already addressed the importance of learning a potentially new language in order to feel more at home when settling down in a new country. This is a major step to not feeling like a stranger in your new place of living.

You might think that English is an international language that will help you communicate all around the world. However, you should keep in mind that this is about more than two weeks of vacation in a foreign country. It is for an extended period of time. Learning the language enables you to understand your surroundings and communicate with the people, even if they do not happen to speak English. Consider it the “door opener”.

Keeping an open mind and positive attitude towards this new chapter of your life is an important factor as well.

 

Inform yourself

Make it a point to learn about your new country. The new country in general does not seem that different from what you are used to. Still, there might still be differences that are more subtle and therefore less obvious. This can lead to unnecessary misunderstandings and complications, or even legal trouble.

 

Laws and regulations

Legal trouble in particular is something you should be careful to avoid. Things that might be legal in your home country/state might be considered a crime in your new destination. An important example for such a difference is the use and/or possession of recreational drugs. Depending on which country you are in, violating the local drug legislation can get you in very serious trouble and might result in severe punishment.

In any case, it is probably also a good idea to be aware of how to contact your embassy or consulate etc. This applies to potential emergency situations, but also in case you need to renew your passport etc.

 

Medical records and other documentation

You should have your medical records translated to the local language. This makes the initial contact and general communication with your new health care providers much easier. When it comes to important documents like your birth certificate, marriage license etc., you might already have had them translated in the course of the immigration/visa process. If that is not the case, why not arrange for a certified translation of those?

 

If you are interested in topics all around moving, make sure to follow our blog! For a free estimate for your own move: Simply send us a message!

 

Moving out of the Country? How to Make Yourself at Home Abroad (Part 2) was last modified: September 24th, 2019 by Daniel Melazzo

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